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Introducing the TUC handbook, Autism in the Workplace

About the author

Janine Booth, is a member of the TUC Disabled Workers Committee and the committee of Autistic-UK. She is a former member of the national Council of Executives of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT). Janine runs Autism in the Workplace training events with the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA). You can contact Janine by emailing j.booth@rmt.org.uk

How workplaces can create difficulties for autistic workers

From the TUC handbook, Autism in the Workplace

Workplaces and employers make work difficult for autistic workers for the following reasons:

Discrimination: Treating the autistic worker differently from, less favourably than, others.

Bullying by management, including ridicule and physical/ verbal abuse.

Lack of communication and support.

How workplaces can create difficulties for workers with autistic dependants

From the TUC handbook, Autism in the Workplace

Refusal of time off: An employer may refuse a request for time off, for example a career break or a period of leave to adjust and make arrangements when a
dependant is diagnosed with autism.

Childcare: Few employers provide workplace childcare; of those that do, few provide care suitable for autistic children.

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