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Making workplaces autism-friendly

From the TUC handbook, Autism in the Workplace

Many employers assume that they do not need to make any changes until a worker identifies him/herself as autistic and requests adjustments (if they even think about the issue at all!). However, there are plenty of changes that an employer can implement to make the workplace more autism-friendly before an individual requests it. The advantages of doing this are:

Nothing about autistic people without autistic people

From the TUC handbook, Autism in the Workplace

The trade union movement supports the demand of the disabled people’s movement: ‘Nothing About Us Without Us’.

Many trade unions have structures for disabled members; if so, it may be useful to invite and welcome autistic members’ involvement in these.

There are organisations of autistic people, and trade unionists may benefit from their expertise.

Autism and Hate crime

From the TUC handbook, Autism in the Workplace

In 2013, Labour MP Ian Mearns introduced a Ten-Minute Rule Bill to require the police to maintain a register of hate crimes committed against people with learning difficulties, learning disabilities and autism. During the early months of 2014, this Bill is progressing through its Parliamentary stages.

Autism: What your union can do

From the TUC Handbook, Autism in the Workplace:

Be aware that your membership (nationally, in your region, branch, workplace, etc.) is neurologically diverse, even if no-one has identified themselves to you as being on the autistic spectrum or having another neurological condition. Your union’s strength comes from uniting its members and mobilising the talents of all its members.

Defend your members

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