Marxist. Trade Unionist. Socialist-feminist. Author. Poet. Speaker. Tutor. RMT ex-Exec. Workers' Liberty. Autie. Bi. PUFC fan.

Defending public services

Battles against privatisation and cuts

Poetry & Opposition

Submitted by Janine on 3 March 2022 at 18:23

Pompous & Opulent
Prosperous & Ostentatious
Profiteering & On-the-take

Parsimonious & Obstinate
Penny-pinching & 'Orrible
Private & Obscene

Perfidious & Odious
Poisonous & Objectionable
Punishing & Oppressive

Petition & Organise
Protest & Outrage
Picket & Occupy

Public & Ownership.

TUC Disabled Workers Condemn P&O Sackings

Submitted by Janine on 3 March 2022 at 15:13

The TUC's Disabled Members' Committee has made this statement: Accessible public transport is essential for disabled people to participate in society on an equal and independent basis. To be genuinely accessible, public transport must be adequately staffed by workers with decent standards of training, pay, conditions and security of employment.

Poplar: the Borough that Fought Back and Won

Submitted by Janine on 3 March 2022 at 13:15

… and why it matters today

By Janine Booth, published in RMT News.

The two biggest employers in the east London borough of Poplar one hundred years were the railways and the docks. Our forerunner unions had plenty of members there. Their jobs involved long hours and low pay, but they were unionised, so they were fighting for, and winning, improvements.

Effluenza

Submitted by Janine on 11 November 2021 at 14:29

Our public sewage industry
was sold to private bidders
Who don't dispose of putrid waste
but dump it in the rivers

They take responsibility
and flush it down the loo
For building up the affluent
builds effluence up too

The Tories' excremental sale
saw treatment work neglected
As income goes to bonuses
so beaches are infected

Poplar's rates victory: Ten key points

Submitted by Janine on 5 May 2021 at 09:21

One hundred years ago, a big movement grew in the east London borough of Poplar, headed by thirty councillors who went to prison rather than levy extortionate rates or cut services to the working-class population that elected them. ‘Poplarism’ won.

Why did Poplar win? Here are ten key points, which contain lessons for today.